Tag Archives: odorous

Starbucks verdict on “smelly sandwiches” suffers backlash

Stinky like a dead dog?A little over a month ago, I made a post entitled “Starbucks corporate analysts: sausage on a roll stinks like a dead dog,” expressing my opinion that their decision to remove the “odoriferous” sandwiches from their menus is “…a bunch of smelly, nouveau-rich, pop-culture mock-elitist bullshit….”

The backlash is here. And it’s doing abysmally, because y’all want smarmy stuff like pumpkin-cream cheese scones with chocolate chips for brekkie, I guess.

Andrew Beaujon of Washington City Paper weighs in on the issue:

You Can Pry My Peppered Bacon, Aged Cheddar, and Egg From My Cold, Dead Hands

Involuntarily, I shouted “NOOOO!” when I read this line in the Times‘ story about Starbucks’ three-hour training session last night:

Lest anyone doubt that Starbucks is serious, employees were reminded that the chain intended to get rid of odoriferous breakfast sandwiches, just so customers can smell the coffee again.

Couldn’t they just get rid of the tea, or the Marcus Samuelsson–inspired baked goods, instead? I’ve got two kids, and sometimes those sandwiches are the only reason I have anything to eat before noon. Oh but wait: The Internet comes to the rescue

Meanwhile, the food critic at the San Diego Union-Tribune asks:

…I’ve endured parched maple scones in L.A., sickly-sweet streusel coffeecake in Chicago and a muffin in the Boston airport that didn’t make it past the first trash can.

What’s with Starbucks’ pastries? How can they be uniformly dry and tasteless in markets across the country? How can a company that prides itself on consistency and quality control of its coffee products be so hopelessly out of the loop with its edibles…?

Read the entire column

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The Durian Fruit

Not widely known to Americans, the Durian fruit is a South Asian “delicacy,” which, like so many “gourmet” foods, is either loved or despised. But regardless of whether one likes it or hates it, it seems that all agree its odor is pungent – so pungent, in fact, that in Singapore, signs prohibiting carrying Durian on public transportation are posted–

No Durian

Lord Alfred Russell Wallace wrote, in “On the Bamboo and Durian of Borneo” (1856), that:

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Man killed roommate because of stinky feet

Roomate Killed over “Stinky Feet”

A Texas man is accused of stabbing his roommate to death because the man complained about his “stinky feet,” local media reports.

The two men rented a small bedroom in a Houston apartment from a married couple with a baby.

The mother and child were sitting outside Saturday evening when the men started drinking in their room, the Houston Chronicle reported Monday.

They started fighting about the man’s “stinky feet” and the woman peered into the room to see one of the men holding a knife in his hands, said Sgt. M. Sosa of the homicide squad.

“By the time she got inside, he was on top of the other man,” he told the paper.

The women fled and called for help, and then the roommate “comes after her and says, ‘I didn’t mean to do it, I didn’t mean to do it,'” Sosa said.

William Antonio Serrano, 22, was charged with murder.

The victim’s identity was not released. He was pronounced dead at the scene with multiple stab wounds.

(source)

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“Devil’s Dung”

The proper name is “Asefoetida” (also Asefetida). To remember it, think (ass + fetid).

The Devil, doing his sulfurous business Ferula assafoetida, (family Apiaceae), alternative spelling asafetida (also known as devil’s dung, stinking gum, asant, food of the gods, hing, and giant fennel) is a species of Ferula native to Iran…Asafoetida’s English and scientific name is derived from the Persian word for resin (asa) and Latin foetida, which refers to its strong sulfurous odor. Its pungent odor has resulted in its being called by many unpleasant names; thus in French it is known (among other names) as Merde du Diable (Devil’s Shit); in some dialects of English too it was known as Devil’s Dung, and equivalent names can be found in most Germanic languages… (source)

Back in the days when herbal medicine, founded partly on myth and partly on fact, was the norm, a common practice among fishwives and farmwives was to mix a paste of asefetida resin, and hang it in a bag around a child’s neck to ward off worms, colds, diptheria, smallpox, and other noxious diseases. This practice probably has its roots in the antiquated idea that disease is the product of “humours” or “vapors” which arise from the earth – the preventative “rationale” being that one stink will ward off another.

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