Tag Archives: disease

“Stinky Cheese Disease”

Stinky people are not coolI’ve decided it might be fun to feature posts, from around WordPress, on the general topic of stench. It’s pertinent and it’s often amusing (or disgusting).

To kick things off, I’d like to highlight a post from Currently Dreaming’s Weblog entitled “Stinky Cheese Disease”–

So, I’m strolling the aisles of the grocery store, like I do every week, minding my own business…when a smell so hideous that my eyes start to water does a full-body slam on me. I look up from my grocery list and see YOU. The Man in the Dirty Overalls. I push my cart at warp speed to get around you, skid around the end display and say a prayer in the fresh air in front of the pickle display.

“Please don’t follow me! Please don’t follow me! Please don’t follow me!”

Read the Entire Article

You have our sympathy, Currentlydreaming – for while “Things That Stink” documents that which issues from the Crack of the Earth, we do not enjoy the direct experience of stench, especially when its source is the crust covering the body of a chronically stinky person in bib overalls. Not long ago we were at a book sale, and therein was a man with pit odor so rank, so strong, that it would have been impossible to distinguish him from a vat of month old Spaghetti-Os. We were not pleased.

Praise it

Flush This

Advertisements

Sacred Cow ‘Naan’ Hits the Shelves in India

Jeez – and I thought “New Age” was out of control in America. Suggestion: stick with the Nag Champa.

Now Guess What Comes In Packages – Cow Dung Cakes!

[Excerpts]

Dookie cakesNews Post India, Jan 9, 2008–Don’t be surprised to find packaged cow dung cakes sitting pretty with toiletries and groceries at retail stores here.

After cow urine or ‘gau mutra’, packaged cow dung cakes or ‘kanda’ have now hit the market and they are the brainchild of the city-based Gau Sena, which literally translated means ‘cow army’.

The Gau Sena, which has launched the product under the brand Gauvar in Jaipur, claims it has mixed many ingredients in the cow dung cake so that burning it could purify the environment. The cakes would also help keep diseases at bay, the organisation claims….

…Gupta said the product has cow dung, water of the holy Ganges river*, cow urine, rose water, cow milk, items of fire sacrifice – ‘hawan samagri’, rose petals, rice, clove, cardamom, the ayurvedic product guggal, camphor, butter, sawdust of the mango tree, ‘itra’ (essence), extract of tulsi, sandalwood powder and sand from the feet of sacred cows.

Read the complete article

*Holy the Ganges may be, but it is well known that the counts of fecal coliform bacteria in the river are 3000 times higher than is considered safe in developed countries. The Ganges is one of the most polluted waterways in the world.


Addendum: Note resemblance between kanda (upper right) and Little Debbie Oatmeal Creme Pies Little Debbie Oatmeal Creme PiesLittle Debbie

Praise it

Flush This

In Days of Olde…

…the shit ran freely in the streets.

Gardy Loo!

An excerpt from Christine A. Powell’s excellent online essay, “A Matter of Convenience”

In Renaissance Scotland, the housewives threw their chamberpot contents and slops out the windows with the cry “Gardy Loo!” (This evidently derived from the French “Gardez l’eau,” meaning “Look out for the water!”) Unfortunately, the sound of the cry and the discarded material often arrived simultaneously. Woe to the one who looked up to see what was happening. It is believed that this may be the origin of the British term “loo” for a toilet (Pudney, 28-9). The high-rises of Edinburgh were hardly the only places in Europe to present a sanitation problem during this era.

Indeed, the period from 1550 to 1750 has been called the “two rather insanitary centuries.” When the court of Charles II spent the summer of 1665 in Oxford, the local diarist Anthony Wood observed they were “nasty and beastly, leaving at their departure their excrements in every corner, in chimneys, studies, coalhouses, [and] cellars.” Contemporary accounts and engravings frequently illustrate the morning ritual in English and Scottish cities of emptying one’s ordure out of upper-floor windows into the streets beneath (Wright, 75-8). It was not until the mid-1800s, when Dr. John Snow proved the connection between cholera and sewage-polluted drinking water, that cities began to control their waste (Colman, 46). There is no reason to suppose that Port Royal and other contemporary cities in the colonies were any cleaner than those in Europe during the “insanitary centuries.” (source)

Praise it

Flush This

Henry VIII was rotten…

Stinky Hank

…both literally, and figuratively, according to my late Grandmother, who was something of an “expert” on the English monarchies. So rotten, that when a group of men carried his dead body out, three died from the smell alone.

As a long-standing legend, this is delightful – the stuff that fishwives tales are made of. How fitting that this murderous megalomaniac, this bloated, syphlitic adulterer, none too clean to start with (this was in the days when the ostensibly “clean” people took baths once a month) should end up in such a state.

Continue reading